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2003 GM 2500HD 6.0 Engine Miss

This is a discussion on 2003 GM 2500HD 6.0 Engine Miss within the Technical / Maintenance forums, part of the General Discussion category; I have a 2003 GM 2500HD w/ a 6.0 gas engine. It has 144k miles. The truck recently started to ...

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    2003 GM 2500HD 6.0 Engine Miss


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    I have a 2003 GM 2500HD w/ a 6.0 gas engine. It has 144k miles. The truck recently started to miss on cylinders 5 & 6. To this point we have replaced the plugs & wires, swapped out injectors and coil packs with know good ones, checks for cracked valve springs and replaced the intake manifold and gasket with new parts. The truck still has the same miss on 5 & 6.
    When the engine is at idol the miss is at it worst. After 2000 RPM the miss is gone and the engine runs smooth.
    I am open to any suggestions at this point.

  2. #2
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    Re: 2003 GM 2500HD 6.0 Engine Miss

    Did you ever scan for codes before you change everything out?
    Bad 02 sensors will cause a miss.

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    Re: 2003 GM 2500HD 6.0 Engine Miss

    I have checked the codes. (PO300)
    Using the Snap-On scan tool it shows the miss is always on cylinders 5 & 6.

  4. #4
    2500 6.0 vortec
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    Re: 2003 GM 2500HD 6.0 Engine Miss

    more then lickly a bad cat.
    Last edited by 6.0vortecchevy; 06-03-2009 at 07:42 AM.

    2500 6.0 vortec 6in skyjacker lift with keys on 16in eagle wrapped in good year kevlar 285, LPP LT's, gmpp cam, efi live tuning software, true dual flowmaster 40 series Circle D 2500-2800.

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    Re: 2003 GM 2500HD 6.0 Engine Miss

    Can a bad cat cause specific cylinders to miss? This is not random. Its always 5 & 6. There is no rotten egg smell and the cat does not get excessively hot.

  6. #6
    2500 6.0 vortec
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    Re: 2003 GM 2500HD 6.0 Engine Miss

    yea it could be the prob.

    2500 6.0 vortec 6in skyjacker lift with keys on 16in eagle wrapped in good year kevlar 285, LPP LT's, gmpp cam, efi live tuning software, true dual flowmaster 40 series Circle D 2500-2800.

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    Re: 2003 GM 2500HD 6.0 Engine Miss

    To verify if converter or not you have to check both converters and remove o2 sensor before converter and install back pressure gauge and check back presure. should not be more then 3 psi . Best way is to quickly crack to WOT and see if gauge flucuates over 3psi if it does the conveter probally.

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    Re: 2003 GM 2500HD 6.0 Engine Miss

    Could also be a bad ground on the rear of one of the cylinder heads which grounds the pcm (G103) or read bulletin I posted:

    #PIP4138F: SES Light Misfire DTC P0300 And/Or Tick Noise - Potential Valvetrain Concern - (Feb 3, 2009)


    Subject: SES Light, Misfire, DTC P0300, and/or Tick Noise - Potential Valvetrain Concern


    Models: 2008-2009 Buick LaCrosse, Allure (Canada Only)

    2006-2007 Cadillac CTS-V

    2002-2009 Cadillac Escalade

    2002-2009 Chevrolet Avalanche

    1999-2009 Chevrolet Express, Silverado, Suburban, Tahoe

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    2003-2006 Chevrolet SSR

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    2005-2009 Saab 97x

    with 4.8L, 5.3L, 6.0L Gen III V8 Engine

    (RPO Codes L33, L59, LM7, LR4, LQ4, LQ9)

    or 4.8L, 5.3L, 6.0L, 6.2L, 7.0L Gen IV V8 Engine

    (RPO Codes L76, L92, L9H, LC9, LFA, LH6, LH8, LMF, LMG, LS2, LS3, LS4, LS7, LY2, LY5, LY6)




    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This PI was superseded to add 2009 models, remove information about collapsed AFM lifters, and add diagnostic information to help isolate a worn cam lobe and/or lifter roller. The collapsed AFM lifter information was removed because it was incorporated into a separate PI to help engineering investigate that specific issue. The Supercharged 6.2L (LS9 and LSA) engines were purposely excluded from this PI since both engine RPO codes are on exchange at the time of this PI supersession. Please discard PIP4138E.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The following diagnosis might be helpful if the vehicle exhibits the symptom(s) described in this PI.

    Condition/Concern:
    Some customers may complain of a SES light, engine misfire, and/or engine tick noise.

    If the SES light is on, the technician will find a P0300-P0308 DTC with misfires counting on a single cylinder that may or may not be felt. This may occur consistently, or it may occur intermittently. If a tick noise is verified, it will not be eliminated by canceling fuel injectors and the noise will sound like a valvetrain tick.

    In either case, the cause of this concern may not be isolated after following SI diagnosis. This PI is written for technicians who experience this concern and follow SI diagnosis without isolating the cause of this concern.

    Recommendation/Instructions:
    If SI diagnosis does not isolate the cause of this concern, it may be the result of any of the following:

    1) worn camshaft lobe and/or lifter roller
    2) a sticking valve
    3) valve leakage
    4) a broken valve spring
    5) a collapsed AFM (Active Fuel Management) lifter.
    If SI diagnosis does not isolate the cause of this concern, review the information below, determine which description best matches the vehicle you are working on, and perform the suggestions as necessary, starting with the easiest ones first:

    1): Worn Cam Lobe and/or Lifter Roller:

    Generally, a worn cam lobe on these engines will create a consistent tick noise at cam speed and/or a misfire with a P0300-P0308 DTC. The misfire may or may not be felt and the misfire could occur at all RPMs or just a specific RPM, such as idle only or only at high RPM. If a noise is present, it will not be eliminated by cancelling fuel injectors and generally, the static compression and cylinder leakage will be similar on all cylinders.

    The following suggestions may help determine if a worn cam lobe and/or lifter is causing this concern:

    • Use a wooden hammer handle to apply pressure to the following locations of the rocker arms during the noise to determine which one is making noise: valve side, push rod side, and side of the rocker. If the noise is changed by applying pressure to the valve side of the rocker, this is most likely the result of a lifter and/or cam lobe concern on that cylinder.


    • Back off the related rocker arm a couple of turns and listen for a change in the noise. If the noise diminishes and there is no problem found with the valve spring, push rod, or rocker arm, this is most likely the result of a worn lifter roller and/or cam lobe.


    • Measure the cam lobe lift at the push rod side of the rocker arm. The lift in this location will differ from the SI specification but it should be similar as compared with other rockers on the same bank. The misfiring/ticking cylinder should obviously have less lift than the comparison cylinders if this is the result of a worn lifter roller and/or cam lobe. Another possibility of no/low lift on cylinders 1, 4, 6, or 7 on an AFM engine would be a collapsed AFM lifter. If a collapsed AFM lifter is found, refer to the latest version of PIP4568 for additional information.


    • If the tests above do not isolate the cause of this concern, it may be necessary to visually inspect the lifter rollers and cam lobes for obvious damage, such as flat spots, pits, grooves. scoring, gouging, flaking, rusting, etc.. It is very easy to overlook a damaged cam lobe when inspecting them through the lifter bores and just because the lifter rollers are not worn, does not mean that the related cam lobes are okay. Both pieces need to be carefully inspected. It may help to use a bore scope or pen light when inspecting the cam lobes through the lifter bores. In some cases, the worn cam lobe may not be discovered until the camshaft is physically removed from the engine and inspected for the issues mentioned earlier in this paragraph.


    Follow SI procedures to replace the camshaft and all lifters if a worn camshaft lobe or lifter roller is found.

    Notice: If a worn cam lobe or roller lifter is found on an engine with AFM, also inspect the VLOM (Valve Lifter Oil Manifold) screen for debris, which is located in the VLOM below the oil pressure sensor. Clean the VLOM screen if any debris is present.



    2): Sticking Valve:

    Generally, a sticking valve on these engines will cause an engine misfire that may or may not be felt and it may occur consistently or intermittently. It is unlikely that any engine noise will be present. It may be temperature sensitive and it may be more apparent during certain operating conditions, such as driving up a grade, cresting a hill, or during hard acceleration. A good indicator of a sticking valve is if engine misfires continue to count on an aggressive deceleration with engine braking. If the misfire occurs consistently, a static compression test, running compression test or cylinder leakage test may isolate the sticking valve. However, it is unlikely that any of these tests will isolate the sticking valve if the misfire only occurs while driving at specific conditions.

    The following suggestions may help determine if a sticking valve is causing this concern: Follow SI procedures to remove the valve springs and seals from the valves of the misfiring cylinder. Before removing the air pressure from the cylinder, tightly wrap a rubber band or tie strap around the tip of each valve stem to prevent the valves from dropping into the cylinder. Release the air pressure from the cylinder and work the valve up and down in the guide while turning the valve 360 degrees. If any binding is felt, a stem to guide clearance concern exists and should be repaired by following SI procedures.

    If okay, rotate and snap the valve onto the valve seat to make sure that it easily comes off of the seat again. If you have to use force to tap the valve off of the seat, excessive carbon build up exists, which may be repaired by adding a bottle of GM Fuel System Treatment Plus to the fuel tank, filling the vehicle with one of the Top Tier gasolines listed in the latest version of 04-06-04-047, and driving the vehicle extensively. Bulletin 05-00-89-078 lists the part number for GM Fuel System Treatment Plus.

    If this does not correct the concern, slowly inducing Upper Engine and Fuel Injection Cleaner through the throttle body or an engine vacuum source off of idle may correct the concern. Extreme care must be taken not to hydrolock the engine when inducing the cleaner. Do not force the engine to stall by inducing too much cleaner at once or the engine may hydrolock. After inducing the cleaner, allow the cleaner to soak with the engine off for 1 hour, test drive the vehicle, and re-evaluate the concern. If the vehicle is repaired, advise the customer to only use one of the Top Tier Gasolines listed in the latest version of 04-06-04-047 to minimize valve deposits in the future.

    3): Valve Leakage:

    Generally, valve leakage on this engine will cause a consistent engine misfire that may or may not be felt and is more apparent at idle or low RPM. Normally, no engine noise will be present and in most cases, a static compression test or running compression test will not reveal anything abnormal unless the leakage is very high.

    Typically, the Cylinder Leakage Test outlined in SI should isolate valve leakage by finding excessive leakage past an intake or exhaust valve, as compared with others.

    If a valve sealing concern is found, it should be repaired by following SI repair procedures.

    4): Broken Valve Spring:

    Generally, a broken valve spring on this engine will cause a tick noise and/or an engine misfire. In either case, the concern may occur consistently or intermittently. If it is causing an engine misfire, it may or may not be felt and it may only occur at specific operating conditions, such as high RPM driving, etc.. In some instances, a static compression test, running compression test, and/or cylinder leakage test may isolate the broken valve spring, while in other instances where the concern is intermittent, it may not if the spring remains stacked together during the tests.

    It may be necessary to visually inspect the valve springs by closely examining them. Sometimes, the two broken pieces of the spring will remain stacked together so it may be hard to detect when visually inspecting them. As a result, it may help to lightly push on different places on the springs with a small hammer handle.

    If a broken valve spring is found, replace the broken valve spring as necessary.

    5): Collapsed AFM Lifter (Engines with AFM Only):

    Some customers may comment on an SES light, engine misfire, and/or tick noise. This may be the result of an AFM lifter that unlocks as soon as the engine is started or one that is mechanically collapsed/stuck.

    If an AFM lifter unlocks as soon as the engine is started, a SES light and DTC P0300 will be experienced with engine misfires on cylinder 1, 4, 6, or 7 but it is unlikely that any noise will be experienced. If an AFM lifter is mechanically collapsed/stuck, a consistent valvetrain tick noise, SES light, and DTC P0300 will be experienced with engine misfires on cylinder 1, 4, 6, or 7. If either of these AFM lifter concerns are suspected, please refer to the latest version of PIP4568 for additional information.

    Please follow this diagnostic or repair process thoroughly and complete each step. If the condition exhibited is resolved without completing every step, the remaining steps do not need to be performed.

    GM bulletins are intended for use by professional technicians, NOT a "do-it-yourselfer". They are written to inform these technicians of conditions that may occur on some vehicles, or to provide information that could assist in the proper service of a vehicle. Properly trained technicians have the equipment, tools, safety instructions, and know-how to do a job properly and safely. If a condition is described, DO NOT assume that the bulletin applies to your vehicle, or that your vehicle will have that condition. See your GM dealer for information on whether your vehicle may benefit from the information.

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    Re: 2003 GM 2500HD 6.0 Engine Miss

    Hello, our 6.0 had an engine miss at an idle on the #2 cylinder only. After all the new coil and plugs and wires, I just by accident wanted to check the fuel pressure and discovered the fuel pressure regulator was spitting fuel. Thats a bad thing making a very rick condition. I replaced it and the miss was solved. I hope this helps.

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