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misfire service bulletin

This is a discussion on misfire service bulletin within the Technical / Maintenance forums, part of the General Discussion category; Does anyone know any info on the TSB for 2007-2011 Silverado for a check engine light for engine misfire? 2008 ...

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    misfire service bulletin


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    Does anyone know any info on the TSB for 2007-2011 Silverado for a check engine light for engine misfire? 2008 5.3L

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    2nd Amendment Supporter mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Re: misfire service bulletin

    Yes there is 6 of them which one do you want?

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    Re: misfire service bulletin

    I'm not for sure. I think it is either
    TSB Number: PIP-4138K NHTSA Number: 10037933, or
    TSB Number: PIP-4568K NHTSA Number: 10037941

    Thanks

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    2nd Amendment Supporter mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Re: misfire service bulletin

    Here ya go.

    #PIP4138K: SES Light Misfire DTC P0300 And/Or A Chirp Squeak Squeal Or Tick Noise - Potential Valve Train Concern - (Jan 18, 2011)
    Subject: SES Light, Misfire, DTC P0300, and/or a Chirp, Squeak, Squeal, or Tick Noise - Potential Valve train Concern

    Models: 2004-2007 Buick Rainier
    2008-2009 Buick LaCrosse, Allure (Canada Only)
    2006-2011 Cadillac CTS-V
    2002-2011 Cadillac Escalade
    2010-2011 Chevrolet Camaro
    2002-2011 Chevrolet Avalanche
    1999-2011 Chevrolet Express, Silverado, Suburban, Tahoe
    2009-2011 Chevrolet Colorado
    2003-2009 Chevrolet Trailblazer
    2006-2009 Chevrolet Impala SS
    2006-2007 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
    2003-2006 Chevrolet SSR
    2005-2011 Chevrolet Corvette
    2009-2011 GMC Canyon
    2003-2009 GMC Envoy
    1999-2011 GMC Savana, Sierra, Yukon
    2003-2010 Hummer H2
    2008-2010 Hummer H3
    2008-2010 Pontiac G8
    2005-2006 Pontiac GTO
    2005-2008 Pontiac Grand Prix GXP
    2005-2009 Saab 97x
    with a V8 engine

    This PI was superseded to update recommended field. Please discard PIP4138J.

    The following diagnosis might be helpful if the vehicle exhibits the symptom(s) described in this PI.
    Condition/Concern:

    Some customers may complain of a SES light, engine misfire, and/or engine noise. If the SES light is on, the technician will find a P0300-P0308 DTC with misfires counting on a single cylinder that may or may not be felt. This may occur consistently, or it may occur intermittently. If a noise is verified, it will not be eliminated by canceling fuel injectors and the noise will occur at camshaft speed (half of crankshaft speed). The noise may be described as a chirp, squeak, squeal, or tick noise and may increase off of idle.

    In either case, the cause of this concern may not be isolated after following SI diagnosis. This PI is written for technicians who experience this concern and follow SI diagnosis without isolating the cause of this concern.
    Recommendation/Instructions:

    If SI diagnosis does not isolate the cause of this concern, it may be the result of any of the following:
    1. Worn camshaft lobe and/or lifter roller
    2. A sticking valve
    3. Valve leakage
    4. A broken valve spring
    5. A collapsed AFM (Active Fuel Management) lifter.

    If SI diagnosis does not isolate the cause of this concern, review the information below, determine which description best matches the vehicle you are working on, and perform the suggestions as necessary, starting with the easiest ones first:

    1. Worn Cam Lobe and/or Lifter Roller:

    Generally, a worn cam lobe on this engine family will create a consistent chirp, squeak, squeal, or tick noise at camshaft speed and/or a misfire with a P0300-P0308 DTC. The misfire may or may not be felt and the misfire could occur at all RPM or just a specific RPM, such as idle only or only at high RPM. If a noise is present, it will not be eliminated by cancelling fuel injectors and generally, the static compression and cylinder leakage will be similar on all cylinders.

    The following suggestions may help determine if a worn cam lobe and/or lifter is causing this concern:
    • Use a wooden hammer handle to apply pressure to the following locations of the rocker arms during the noise to determine which one is making noise: valve side, push rod side, and side of the rocker. If the noise is changed by applying pressure to the valve side of the rocker, this is most likely the result of a lifter and/or cam lobe concern on that cylinder. Sometimes this works, sometimes it does not - it seems to depend on the amount of cam lobe wear.
    • Disconnect the coils and injectors on one bank of the engine, run the engine with the related valve cover removed, and back off the related rocker arm a couple of turns and listen for a change in the noise. If necessary, both rockers and push rods can also be removed one cylinder at a time with the related coil and injectors disconnected. If the noise is eliminated and there is no problem found with the valve spring, push rod, or rocker arm, this is most likely the result of a worn lifter roller and/or cam lobe.
    • Measure the cam lobe lift at the push rod side of the rocker arm. The lift in this location will differ from the SI specification but it should be similar as compared with other rockers on the same bank. The misfiring/ticking cylinder should obviously have less lift than the comparison cylinders if this is the result of a worn lifter roller and/or cam lobe. Another possibility of no/low lift on cylinders 1, 4, 6, or 7 on an AFM engine would be a collapsed AFM lifter. If a collapsed AFM lifter is found, refer to the latest version of PIP4568 for additional information.
    • On engines with AFM (active fuel management), you can command AFM on with the scan tool, which will unlatch the lifters on cylinders 1, 4, 6, and 7 and stop opening the related valves. If the noise is eliminated, there is a good chance that the noise is coming from the valve train of cylinders 1, 4, 6, or 7. If there is no problem found with the push rods, rockers, or valve springs, the noise is most likely coming from a worn lifter roller and/or cam lobe on cylinders 1, 4, 6, or 7.
    • If the tests above do not isolate the cause of this concern, it may be necessary to visually inspect the lifter rollers and cam lobes for obvious damage, such as flat spots, pits, grooves, scoring, gouging, flaking, rusting, etc...It is very easy to overlook a damaged cam lobe when inspecting them through the lifter bores and just because the lifter rollers are not worn, does not mean that the related cam lobes are okay. Both pieces need to be carefully inspected. It may help to use a bore scope or pen light when inspecting the cam lobes through the lifter bores. In some cases, the worn cam lobe may not be discovered until the camshaft is physically removed from the engine and inspected for the issues mentioned above.

    Notice: Follow SI procedures to replace the camshaft and all lifters if a worn camshaft lobe or lifter roller is found. Also replace the plastic lifter guide for the lifter that had the damaged cam lobe and/or lifter roller (For 2010 Model Year, replace all of the plastic lifter guides). On AFM engines, also replace the VLOM (Valve Lifter Oil Manifold) filter screen that is under the oil pressure sensor.

    2. Sticking Valve:

    Generally, a sticking valve on this engine family will cause an engine misfire that may or may not be felt and it may occur consistently or intermittently. It is unlikely that any engine noise will be present. It may be temperature sensitive and it may be more apparent during certain operating conditions, such as driving up a grade, cresting a hill, or during hard acceleration. A good indicator of a sticking valve is if engine misfires continue to count on an aggressive deceleration with engine braking. If the misfire occurs consistently, a static compression test, running compression test or cylinder leakage test may isolate the sticking valve. However, it is unlikely that any of these tests will isolate the sticking valve if the misfire only occurs while driving at specific conditions.

    The following suggestions may help determine if a sticking valve is causing this concern:

    Follow SI procedures to remove the valve springs and seals from the valves of the misfiring cylinder. Before removing the air pressure from the cylinder, tightly wrap a rubber band or tie strap around the tip of each valve stem to prevent the valves from dropping into the cylinder. Release the air pressure from the cylinder and work the valve up and down in the guide while turning the valve 360 degrees.

    If any binding is felt, a stem to guide clearance concern exists and should be repaired by following SI procedures.

    If okay, rotate and snap the valve onto the valve seat to make sure that it easily comes off of the seat again. If you have to use force to tap the valve off of the seat, excessive carbon build up exists, which may be repaired by decarboning the engine.

    Notice: Refer to the latest version of PIP4753 for decarboning instructions.

    3. Valve Leakage:

    Generally, valve leakage on this engine family will cause a consistent engine misfire that may or may not be felt and is more apparent at idle or low RPM. Normally, no engine noise will be present and in most cases, a static compression test or running compression test will not reveal anything abnormal unless the leakage is very high.

    Typically, the Cylinder Leakage Test outlined in SI should isolate valve leakage by finding excessive leakage past an intake or exhaust valve, as compared with others.

    Notice: If a valve sealing concern is found, it should be repaired by following SI repair procedures.

    4. Broken Valve Spring:

    Generally, a broken valve spring on this engine family will cause a tick noise and/or an engine misfire. In either case, the concern may occur consistently or intermittently. If it is causing an engine misfire, it may or may not be felt and it may only occur at specific operating conditions, such as high RPM driving, etc...

    In some instances, a static compression test, running compression test, and/or cylinder leakage test may isolate the broken valve spring, while in other instances; it may not if the spring remains stacked together during the tests. As a result, it may be necessary to visually inspect the valve springs by closely examining them. Sometimes, the two broken pieces of the spring will remain stacked together so it may be hard to detect when visually inspecting them. As a result, it may help to lightly push on different places on the springs with a small hammer handle.

    Notice: If a broken valve spring is found, replace the broken valve spring as necessary.

    5. Collapsed AFM Lifter (Engines with AFM Only):

    Some customers may comment on an SES light, engine misfire, and/or tick noise. This may be the result of an AFM lifter that unlocks as soon as the engine is started or one that is mechanically collapsed/stuck.

    If an AFM lifter unlocks as soon as the engine is started, a SES light and DTC P0300 will be experienced with engine misfires on cylinder 1, 4, 6, or 7 but it is unlikely that any noise will be experienced. If an AFM lifter is mechanically collapsed/stuck, a consistent valve train tick noise, SES light, and DTC P0300 will be experienced with engine misfires on cylinder 1, 4, 6, or 7.

    Notice: If either of these AFM lifter concerns is suspected, please refer to the latest version of PIP4568 for additional information.

    Please follow this diagnostic or repair process thoroughly and complete each step. If the condition exhibited is resolved without completing every step, the remaining steps do not need to be performed.
    Last edited by mudbuddy; 11-24-2011 at 09:33 AM.

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    Re: misfire service bulletin

    #PIP4568K: Tick Noise And/Or Misfires On AFM Cylinders 1 4 6 And/Or 7 - (Aug 23, 2011)
    Subject: Tick Noise And/or Misfires On AFM Cylinders 1 4 6 And/or 7

    Models: 2008-2009 Buick LaCrosse, Allure (Canada Only)
    2007 Buick Rainier
    2007-2011 Cadillac Escalade
    2010-2011 Chevrolet Camaro SS
    2007-2011 Chevrolet Avalanche, Silverado, Suburban, Tahoe
    2006-2009 Chevrolet Trailblazer
    2006-2009 Chevrolet Impala SS
    2006-2007 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS
    2006-2009 GMC Envoy
    2007-2011 GMC Sierra, Yukon
    2008-2009 Pontiac G8
    2005-2008 Pontiac Grand Prix GXP
    2006-2009 Saab 97x
    With a V8 Engine and AFM (Active Fuel Management):
    RPO Codes L76, L77, L94, L99, LC9, LFA, LH6, LMG, LS4, LY5, LZ1

    This PI was superseded to suggest replacing the plastic lifter guides and to reprogram Police Tahoes. Please discard PIP4568J.

    The following diagnosis might be helpful if the vehicle exhibits the symptom(s) described in this PI.
    Condition/Concern:

    Some customers may comment on an SES light, engine misfire on cylinder 1, 4, 6, or 7 and/or tick noise.

    This may be the result of an AFM lifter that unlocks as soon as the engine is started or one that is mechanically collapsed/stuck all of the time.

    If an AFM lifter unlocks as soon as the engine is started, low compression will be found on that cylinder during an AFM compression test, along with a SES light, DTC P0300, and engine misfires on the related cylinder but it is unlikely that any noise will be experienced.

    If an AFM lifter is mechanically collapsed/stuck, low compression will be found on that cylinder during an AFM compression test, along with a consistent valve train tick noise, SES light, DTC P0300 and engine misfires on the related cylinder.
    Recommendation/Instructions:

    If SI diagnosis does not isolate the cause of this concern, perform the following diagnostic steps as necessary:
    1. Perform a Cylinder Deactivation (Active Fuel Management) System Compression Test in SI. If the running compression of the misfiring cylinder stays below 25 PSI regardless of the AFM solenoid being commanded on or off, an AFM lifter is mechanically collapsed/stuck or unlocking as soon as the engine is started.
    2. Perform the Cylinder Deactivation (Active Fuel Management) Valve Lifter Oil Manifold Diagnosis and Testing in SI. If the test above isolated a possible AFM lifter concern, it will lead to this test, which tests the VLOM (Valve Lifter Oil Manifold) for proper operation. SI states a limited amount of air will leak from the bleed holes and outlet ports even when the solenoids are off, compare the amount of leakage to verify all 4 solenoids are operating the same. If it isolates a concern with the VLOM, replace it and reevaluate the concern.
    3. The AFM lifters can also be monitored for proper operation by carefully inspecting the cylinder 1, 4, 6, and 7 rockers and valves while cranking or briefly running the engine with the valve covers removed in the service bay. If the valve(s) of an AFM cylinder stop moving while doing this test, the AFM lifter is causing the concern.

    Notice: If SI diagnosis or any of the steps above indicate that any AFM lifters are unlocking or collapsed as described above, follow the applicable notes below and replace the VLOM, all AFM lifters, and all plastic lifter guides.

    On the 2008-2009 Pontiac G8, 2010-2011 Camaro, and 2007-2010 Full Size Trucks with AFM, also determine if the AFM pressure relief valve shield that is listed in the latest version of 10-06-01-008 has ever been installed for anything else. If not, remove the oil pan and install the AFM shield. If the shield has been installed before, disregard this step. Due to oil pan differences, this shield will not fit Passenger Cars with the LS4 engine or Mid-Size Utility Vehicles with the LH6 Engine. It is also important to thoroughly clean the inside of the oil pan while it is removed.

    On the 2007-2009 Chevrolet Tahoe with the Police Package, also reprogram the ECM with the latest calibrations. This only applies to Police Vehicles.

    Carefully inspect the camshaft lobes through the lifter bores with a pen light or bore scope to ensure that they are not obviously worn. Also inspect the lifter bores for any obvious scoring/damage that could be a concern.

    When reassembling, ensure that the lifters are properly aligned to the new plastic lifter guides before they are installed. If they are not aligned properly, it may damage the plastic lifter guide once it is torqued, which may allow the lifter to turn in the guide.

    Clean out the related lifter control oil passages (item 1 below) while the old lifters are removed. Generally, it is only necessary to blow through the passages with shop air but if a lot of debris is noted, it may also be necessary to flush the passages out with brake cleaner. The oil should be changed after doing this since the cylinder heads will be off to replace the lifters anyhow.

    Low oil pressure to the VLOM can also cause AFM lifter damage. As a result, it is suggested to note the Tech 2 oil pressure parameter at a hot idle. This is located in the Cylinder Deactivation Data List of the Tech 2. Generally most known good vehicles will have around 30 PSI (207 KPA ) of hot idle oil pressure with new engine oil. As long as there are no oil pressure sensor DTCs, such as a P0522 or P0523, the oil pressure sensor is fairly accurate. If the sensor reads 19 PSI (131 KPA) or less while at a hot idle with new oil, also perform the Cylinder Deactivation (Active Fuel Management) Oil Pressure Relief Valve Diagnosis and Testing as outlined in SI and repair as necessary. In some cases, the new VLOM could correct a low oil pressure concern if there is an internal leak or plugged VLOM filter screen.

    Object Number: 1403340
    Click here for detailed picture of above image.

    Please follow this diagnostic or repair process thoroughly and complete each step. If the condition exhibited is resolved without completing every step, the remaining steps do not need to be performed.

  6. #6
    Registered User RAYJR's Avatar
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    Re: misfire service bulletin

    Hey guys,

    I realize this is an older post, but I have an issue with my 2010 Z71 crew cab LTZ (AFM) and wondering if this may apply to my problem. I've got around 53,000 miles on it. A little over half way into a 250 mile trip the SES came on and I had lost power and seemed to have lost a cylinder. I called the closest dealer to where I was headed and they told me to limp it on in as long as it wasn't leaking oil or losing pressure, it wasn't so I limped it on in. They inspected and as I figured it was down a cylinder. One cylinder had an oil fouled plug, so I'm guessing they went through bullitens and diagnostics and determined the cam and a lifter needed to be replaced so they did. Once that was completed they started it up and it would not keep running, they found that the cam actuator or another name I can't remember becasue my trucks in another state and I'm driving a malibu currently, which I can't stand. ugh, anyway that part had come appart so they replaced it and the cam sensor, they also pulled one head and had it cleaned and tested before this. Once all this was done and put back together they fired it up and oil was still getting into one of the cylinders and fouling the plug. So as of right now it's still sitting at a dealer in another state other than my home state. ANY input on this problem would be grealy appreiciated, I want my truck back, I'm sure the techs are doing their best, but when I left the dealer ship last friday they didn't seem to have any clue.
    HELP!!!!

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    Re: misfire service bulletin

    Sorry for your difficulties. Mine ended up being the lifter itself. They replaced both for cylinder #2 (non-AFM, or standard hydraulic). The lifter uses hydraulic fluid to take up the lash adjustment, instead of having to adjust it manually. Mine was defective, or had something inside the oil passage, and would not fully extend. Therefore, at idle, I was not getting a complete burn. Dealer did good to diagnose it, and the truck runs much better than just before it started throwing codes. Dealer thought it was just a bad lifter because it was about the cleanest 100,000 mile engine he has been it. Way to go Mobil1.

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    Re: misfire service bulletin

    Quote Originally Posted by tony83 View Post
    Sorry for your difficulties. Mine ended up being the lifter itself. They replaced both for cylinder #2 (non-AFM, or standard hydraulic). The lifter uses hydraulic fluid to take up the lash adjustment, instead of having to adjust it manually. Mine was defective, or had something inside the oil passage, and would not fully extend. Therefore, at idle, I was not getting a complete burn. Dealer did good to diagnose it, and the truck runs much better than just before it started throwing codes. Dealer thought it was just a bad lifter because it was about the cleanest 100,000 mile engine he has been it. Way to go Mobil1.
    What year model is yours? mine actually broke the AFM lifter in the #4 cylinder, so they replaced all of them, and it had a flat spot on one of the cam lobes so the replaced it also. they found the #4 cylinder had a stuck ring yesterday and GM told them to replace all 8 pistons and lifters today.

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    Re: misfire service bulletin

    Mine is an 08 with the non-FlexFuel 5.3. Problem started just over 100,000 miles (of course). As long as I was driving above about 800-1000 rpm I couldn't tell anything, but at idle it was rough. Hooked up a diagnostic and watched the #2 misfire counter steadily increase. After so many it would shut off fuel to #2, to prevent burning up the piston I guess. Can tell it has more power afterwards though.

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    Re: misfire service bulletin

    [QUOTE=tony83;5689128]Mine is an 08 with the non-FlexFuel 5.3. Problem started just over 100,000 miles (of course). As long as I was driving above about 800-1000 rpm I couldn't tell anything, but at idle it was rough. Hooked up a diagnostic and watched the #2 misfire counter steadily increase. After so many it would shut off fuel to #2, to prevent burning up the piston I guess. Can tell it has more power afterwards though.[/Q

    one of those stupid AFM lifters.

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    Re: misfire service bulletin

    Well i have an 08 crew cab w/ 5.3L Right after i hit 100k i noticed a squeaking. Thought it was a tensioner or belt so i changed those. Didnt fix anything. now I'm getting a misfire on cyl#6 and gas milage has went south. it has a rough idle now and the squeak has turned into a light knock.

    If i have to tear into the motor to check the cam and lifters, Could I just put in a mild cam instead (of course new springs ect) and just turn off the afm? My Buddys shop can do the tune and work. I live in CA though and am woried about passing smog. truck only has a flowmaster and k&n drop in filter. Its been a great truck till this! Any info is great

    2008 CC Makes 375 Rwhp, motor makes 500hp

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    Re: misfire service bulletin

    Well i have an 08 crew cab w/ 5.3L Right after i hit 100k i noticed a squeaking. Thought it was a tensioner or belt so i changed those. Didnt fix anything. now I'm getting a misfire on cyl#6 and gas milage has went south. it has a rough idle now and the squeak has turned into a light knock.

    If i have to tear into the motor to check the cam and lifters, Could I just put in a mild cam instead (of course new springs ect) and just turn off the afm? My Buddys shop can do the tune and work. I live in CA though and am woried about passing smog. truck only has a flowmaster and k&n drop in filter. Its been a great truck till this! Any info is great

    2008 CC Makes 375 Rwhp, motor makes 500hp

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    Re: misfire service bulletin

    So I tore apart the motor to find a destroyed DOD/AFM lifter and cam lobe! So I'm putting in a new mild cam, springs, lifters, push rods, ls7 valley tray. Sent the 243 heads out to get valve job and cleaned up. Plus oil pump, timing chain and misc stuff while im in there. Then long tubes and y pipe, cat delete, and intake. Then Speed Engineering is going to do the tune and delete the DOD. Hoping to see good hp increase. Made 260whp with the flow master and k&n drop in.

    2008 CC Makes 375 Rwhp, motor makes 500hp

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    Re: misfire service bulletin

    Oddly enough mine was a non-AFM lifter. Something got into the hydraulic passage so it couldn't adjust the valve lash.

 

 

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